Griddle Cake Recipes

GRIDDLE-CAKE RECIPES

39. PROCEDURE IN BAKING GRIDDLE CAKES.--During the preparation of the batter for griddle cakes, have the griddle heating, so that it will be sufficiently hot when the cakes are ready to be baked. Each time, before the baking is begun, grease the griddle, provided it is the kind that requires greasing, by rubbing over it a rind of salt pork or a small cloth pad that has been dipped into a dish of grease. In greasing the griddle, see that there is no excess of grease, as this burns and produces smoke.

When the griddle has become hot enough for the batter to sizzle when it is put on, the baking may be started. Pour the batter on the griddle from the tip of a large spoon, so that the cakes will form as nearly round as possible. When the top surface is full of bubbles, turn the cakes with a spatula or a pancake turner, and allow them to brown on the other side. By the time the cakes are sufficiently browned on both sides, they should be cooked through and ready to serve. If they brown before they have had time to cook through, the griddle is too hot and should be cooled by moving it to a cooler part of the stove or by reducing the heat. A very important point to remember in the baking of griddle cakes is that they should not be turned twice, as this has a tendency to make them heavy.

40. GRIDDLE CAKES.--As is generally known, griddle cakes are thin batters that are made light with a chemical leavening agent. Eggs are often used in such batters, but it is possible to make very excellent griddle cakes without the use of any eggs. It should also be remembered that the use of too much egg is more certain to make the cakes tough and less palatable than if none is used. The kind of flour used for griddle cakes has much to do with the consistency of the batter used for them. If, when the first cakes are placed upon the griddle, the batter seems to be either too thick or too thin, liquid or flour may be added to dilute or thicken the batter until it is of the right consistency. For instance, if bread flour is used, more liquid may be needed, and if pastry flour is used, more flour may be required.

GRIDDLE CAKES
(Sufficient to Serve Six)
  • 3 c. flour
  • 5 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2-1/4 c. milk
  • 2 Tb. melted fat

Mix and sift the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Beat the egg, add to it the milk, and pour this liquid slowly into the dry ingredients. Beat the mixture thoroughly and then add the melted fat. Bake the cakes on a hot griddle as soon as possible after the batter is mixed.

41. SOUR-MILK GRIDDLE CAKES.--Very delicious griddle cakes may be made by using sour milk and soda for the liquid and leavening instead of sweet milk and baking powder. Besides being particularly appetising, such cakes serve to use up left-over milk that may have soured. There is very little difference between the ingredients for this recipe and one calling for sweet milk, except that sour milk, which is a trifle thicker in consistency than sweet milk, requires less flour to thicken the mixture.

SOUR-MILK GRIDDLE CAKES
(Sufficient to Serve Six)
  • 2-1/2 c. flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tb. sugar
  • 1 tsp. soda
  • 2 c. sour milk (not thick)
  • 1 egg

Mix and sift the flour, salt, sugar, and soda. Add to these the sour milk and the egg well beaten. If the milk is thick, the quantity should be increased accordingly. Beat the mixture thoroughly and bake at once on a hot griddle.

42. CORN GRIDDLE CAKES.--The addition of corn meal to a griddle-cake mixture adds variety and food value and produces an agreeable flavor. Where corn meal is cheap, it is an economical ingredient to use in griddle cakes and other hot breads.

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES
(Sufficient to Serve Six)
  • 1/2 c. corn meal
  • 1-1/2 c. boiling water
  • 2 c. milk
  • 2 c. flour
  • 5 tsp. baking powder
  • 1-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2 Tb. melted fat

Add the corn meal to the boiling water, boil 5 minutes, and turn into a bowl. Then add the milk. Next, mix and sift the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar, and stir them into the first mixture. Beat the egg and add to the whole. Finally, stir in the melted fat. Bake on a hot griddle.

43. RICE GRIDDLE CAKES.--If a change in the ordinary griddle cakes that are used for breakfast is desired, rice griddle cakes should be tried. Besides lending variety, the addition of rice to a griddle-cake mixture helps to use up any left-over rice that may have been cooked for another purpose. Steamed or boiled rice used for this purpose should be broken up with a fork before it is mixed in the batter, so that the grains of rice will not stick together in chunks.

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES
(Sufficient to Serve Six)
  • 2-1/2 c. flour
  • 5 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 c. cold cooked rice
  • 1 egg
  • 1-1/2 c. milk
  • 2 Tb. melted fat

Mix and sift the flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Work the rice into the dry ingredients. Add the egg, well beaten, the milk, and the melted fat. Bake on a hot griddle.

44. BUCKWHEAT CAKES.--Buckwheat flour is used for griddle cakes more than for any other purpose. When used in this way it has a very typical flavor that most people find very agreeable. Many prepared buckwheat flours, to which have been added the quantity of leavening agent necessary to raise the mixture, are on the market for the convenience of those who do not desire to prepare the mixture at home. As a rule, these contain a combination of buckwheat and wheat flour. To make cakes from these flours, add the required amount of liquid, either milk or water, and a little sugar, if necessary, and then proceed to bake them on a griddle. While there is no objection to the use of such flours if they are found agreeable, it is more expensive to use them than to make up the buckwheat mixture at home. A recipe for buckwheat cakes that proves very satisfactory is the following:

BUCKWHEAT CAKES
(Sufficient to Serve Six)
  • 2 c. scalded milk
  • 1/2 c. fine bread crumbs
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 yeast cake
  • 3/4 c. lukewarm water
  • 1-1/2 c. buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 c. white flour
  • 1 Tb. molasses
  • 1/4 tsp. soda

Pour the scalded milk over the bread crumbs and add the salt. Dissolve the yeast cake in 1/2 cupful of the lukewarm water and add this to the bread crumbs and milk. Stir in the buckwheat and the white flour, and let the mixture rise overnight. In the morning, stir it well and add the molasses, the soda, and 1/4 cupful of lukewarm water. Bake on a hot griddle.

If cakes are to be baked the next day, retain 1/2 cupful of the batter, to which may be added flour, milk, salt, and molasses. By doing this each day, a starter may be had for a long period of time. If a strong buckwheat flavor is desired, use all buckwheat flour, but if only a slight buckwheat flavor is desired, make the proportion of wheat flour greater and that of the buckwheat smaller.

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HOT BREADS INDEX

Hot Breads in the Diet | Principal Requirements for Hot Breads | Leavening Agents | Hot-Bread Utensils and Their Use | Preparing the Hot-Bread Mixture | Baking the Hot-Bread Mixture | Serving Hot Breads | Popover Recipes | Griddle-Cake Recipes | Waffle Recipes | Muffin Recipes | Corn-Cake Recipes | Biscuit Recipes | Miscellaneous Hot-Bread Recipes | Utilising Left-Over Hot Breads | Luncheon Menu







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